Browse Items (16 total)

  • Collection: Sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Originally modeled for The Gates of Hell, where it was apparently intended to illustrate a poem from Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal, this group was abandoned by Rodin in the final version of The Gates but given a second existence under the present…

Like much of the sculpture of the Romantic movement in French art, Préault's work was rejected from the Paris Salons throughout the 1830s and 1840s. Official recognition came after the Revolution of 1848. This plaster group is the working model for…

Bayre's thorough grounding in classical prototypes is evident in this highly charged representation of an incident from the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs described in Book XII of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Bayre surely knew the series of…

This group is the sculptor's working model for one of two monumental stone sculptures completed in 1870 and still in the garden of the palace at Fontainbleau. Like Venus, the companion sculpture, Jupiter has no precedent in antique iconography and is…

Gian Lorenzo Bernini was the heroic central figure in Italian Baroque sculpture. The influence of his father, the Florentine-born Pietro, can be seen here in the buoyant forms and cottony texture of the Bacchanal. The liveliness and strongly accented…

Acquired in Rome by John Cecil, the fifth Earl of Exeter (1648-1700), this sculpture was long believed to have been the work of Pierre-Étienne Monnot, the French-born sculptor who carved the English statesman's funerary monument. The Andromeda,…