Browse Items (10 total)

The first version of Cabanel's Birth of Venus (Musée d'Orsay, Paris) created a sensation at the Salon of 1863, which was dubbed the "Salon of the Venuses" owing to the number of alluring nudes on view. Embodying the ideals of academic art, the…

Like much of the sculpture of the Romantic movement in French art, Préault's work was rejected from the Paris Salons throughout the 1830s and 1840s. Official recognition came after the Revolution of 1848. This plaster group is the working model for…

Madame de Pompadour, the mistress of Louis XV, greatly admired Boucher and was his patroness from 1747 until her death in 1764. This famous work is one of a pair that she commissioned for the dressing room at Bellevue, her château near Paris. In…

The work has sometimes been confused with a painting of Venus and Mars mentioned by Borghini ("Il riposo," 1584, p. 563) as commissioned by an unspecified emperor, and by Carlo Ridolfi ("Le maraviglie dell'arte," 1648, vol. 1, p. 320) as one of three…

This picture was influenced by but not modeled after Titian's "Venus and Adonis" (Prado, Madrid), which Rubens copied in Madrid in 1628–29. On the whole, however, Rubens's design, in composition and mood, is more like the engraving after a design…