Browse Items (60 total)

Originally modeled for The Gates of Hell, where it was apparently intended to illustrate a poem from Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal, this group was abandoned by Rodin in the final version of The Gates but given a second existence under the present…

In the Salon of 1848, Diaz exhibited a painting entitled "The Departure of Diana for the Hunt," which was criticized for inept drawing. The following year, he painted this picture, larger than the first and characterized by careful draughtsmanship…

The first version of Cabanel's Birth of Venus (Musée d'Orsay, Paris) created a sensation at the Salon of 1863, which was dubbed the "Salon of the Venuses" owing to the number of alluring nudes on view. Embodying the ideals of academic art, the…

Like much of the sculpture of the Romantic movement in French art, Préault's work was rejected from the Paris Salons throughout the 1830s and 1840s. Official recognition came after the Revolution of 1848. This plaster group is the working model for…

Moreau, a virtually unknown artist at the age of thirty-eight, triumphed at the Salon of 1864 with his interpretation of the myth of Oedipus and the Sphinx. This painting represents the moment when Oedipus confronts the winged monster outside Thebes…

Bayre's thorough grounding in classical prototypes is evident in this highly charged representation of an incident from the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs described in Book XII of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Bayre surely knew the series of…

From Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco:

One of the greatest engravers of all time, Dutch Mannerist artist Hendrick Goltzius was also a superb draftsman, skilled painter and successful print publisher. He was born in 1558 to a family of artists…